Tag Archives: business

Demi’s Basic Business Questions: What is Corporation Tax?

We often see headlines about Ireland’s low corporation tax – some are critical, others ecstatic about it. A pretty common question people have is what exactly is corporation tax, and how does the tax big corporations like Google and Facebook pay affect someone like me, the average college student. The aim of the following article is to give a bite-sized introduction to corporation tax and give some guidance on whether it is to be loved or hated.

Firstly, a definition. Corporation tax is the tax companies pay in countries they are resident in on the profit they earn from their business. In Ireland, the tax is at 12.5%, significantly lower than other countries. The average corporation tax rate in Europe is 25.3%, for example. 

Similarly to when we looked at why it is not feasible to print more money in order to combat financial crises, we are brought back to one of the fundamentals of economics – the law of demand. Generally, when something costs more money, less people want it. When something costs less, more people want it. Pretty reasonable, right?

The law of demand can easily be applied to our low corporation tax scenario. If it costs less money to make profits in Ireland (due to the low corporation tax), more corporations will want to set up here. It is argued that this is a positive phenomenon as it leads to Ireland becoming an international hub for multinational companies. Where there are increased companies, there are increased jobs. This reduces the number of skilled young people, university graduates etc. emigrating in search of work. Increased employment boosts the Irish economy and is often something to smile about. 

However, on the other side of the coin, those who are against our competitively low corporation tax level make strong arguments. They point to the profits that corporations such as Twitter and Facebook make and suggest better use for those profits, such as contributing to social welfare schemes. It is also argued that we are putting ourselves at an advantage at the expense of fellow European countries. The discrepancy between corporation tax rates is so high that it is a significant challenge for them to compete. This can be seen as unethical. 

There are numerous points to be made on either side of the debate but it is up to you decide where your opinions lie. 

If you have any more Basic Business Questions you are interested in me tackling, please do not hesitate to email me at dadenira@tcd.ie

Yours in Learning,

Demilade

Demi’s Basic Business Questions: Why Can’t We Just Print More Money?

Money makes the world go round. The converse is also true. Lack of money can make the world stop. This is the reality for many – their worlds are at a standstill because of a lack of money. Because of poverty.

Ending poverty is one of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals to be achieved by 2030. According to the UN, 700 million people live in extreme poverty. Sometimes, grave situations like these cause business newbies like myself to ask the question, “Why can’t we just print more money?”. Unfortunately the solution is not that simple.

Printing more money may be a possible quick fix, but it is only sustainable temporarily. Printing more money can make poor countries even poorer in the long run.

Money is worth the value we give it. If people didn’t believe money to be valuable and accept it in exchange for goods and services, it would simply be like another piece of paper.

Inflation refers to a general increase in the price level of goods and services. This can be caused by increased money in circulation or by people’s incomes rising. The more money readily available, the easier it is to buy things and the more people will want to buy things. Businesses are profit driven and will increase their prices as people can now afford to pay more while not increasing their supply . This is the law of demand – as price increases, demand decreases. More money does not mean less problems, more money simply translates to higher prices. 

We are not the only ones who have flirted with this idea of printing more money in order to increase the standard of living. In order to fulfill the payment of reparations after the war that had made them poor, Germany in 1922 printed money. On the surface it seemed like an excellent idea. In reality, however, they could not have been more wrong. This led to hyper inflation, meaning prices were so inconceivably high that money became next to worthless. It was not uncommon for people to use their money to burn fires. 

Poverty is a pressing issue and it is imperative that we continue to generate solutions on how to tackle it. Unfortunately, money printing is not the one for us today. 

If you have any more Basic Business Questions you are interested in me tackling, please do not hesitate to email me at dadenira@tcd.ie

Yours in Learning,

Demilade